wedding-blog-ireland
Diamond Education – The 4 C’s – CLARITY IN DIAMONDS
Diamond Education – The 4 C’s – CLARITY IN DIAMONDS (via http://bling.ie)

Diamond clarity refers to the level of natural inclusions or blemishes in a diamond. The clarity scale ranges from internally flawless to heavily included. Only about 1 % of gem quality diamonds are flawless, the other 99% have some level of inclusions or blemishes. Clarity grades are reported on all…


 
futurejournalismproject:

jtotheizzoe:

The trouble with retractions
Retractions of scientific papers are up 10-fold, but publishing rates are only up by 44%. What gives? Why is so much research being pulled back, or worse, declared fraudulent?
(via Nature News)

The FJP: Here’s a potential answer for you. It comes courtesy of an article in The Register about the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (BEST) project that we Tumbled earlier today. In it, Richard Muller, the project lead, discusses that science needs to be more open in its publishing practices.

When contacted by The Reg, Muller responded in an email that he believes scientific papers should be widely circulated in “preprint” form before their publication. “It has been traditional throughout most of my career to distribute preprints around the world,” he writes. “In fact, most universities and laboratories had ‘preprint libraries’ where you could frequently find colleagues.”
This preprint system, he told us, is being stifled by major journals. “This traditional peer-review system worked much better than the current Science/Nature system, which in my mind restricts the peer review to 2 or 3 anonymous people who often give a cursory look at the paper.”
While this more tightly controlled review method may enhance the prestige of major journals, Muller told us, it does nothing for the advancement of science.
“I think this abandonment of the traditional peer review system is responsible, in part, for the fact that so many bad papers are being published,” he writes. “These papers have not be vetted by the true peers, the large scientific world.”

futurejournalismproject:

jtotheizzoe:

The trouble with retractions

Retractions of scientific papers are up 10-fold, but publishing rates are only up by 44%. What gives? Why is so much research being pulled back, or worse, declared fraudulent?

(via Nature News)

The FJP: Here’s a potential answer for you. It comes courtesy of an article in The Register about the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (BEST) project that we Tumbled earlier today. In it, Richard Muller, the project lead, discusses that science needs to be more open in its publishing practices.

When contacted by The Reg, Muller responded in an email that he believes scientific papers should be widely circulated in “preprint” form before their publication. “It has been traditional throughout most of my career to distribute preprints around the world,” he writes. “In fact, most universities and laboratories had ‘preprint libraries’ where you could frequently find colleagues.”

This preprint system, he told us, is being stifled by major journals. “This traditional peer-review system worked much better than the current Science/Nature system, which in my mind restricts the peer review to 2 or 3 anonymous people who often give a cursory look at the paper.”

While this more tightly controlled review method may enhance the prestige of major journals, Muller told us, it does nothing for the advancement of science.

“I think this abandonment of the traditional peer review system is responsible, in part, for the fact that so many bad papers are being published,” he writes. “These papers have not be vetted by the true peers, the large scientific world.”

I recently came up against an issue in Safari where the background colour of an element seemed to ‘bleed’ through the edge of the corners when applying both borders and a border-radius (see the image above). After seeing David Cole tweet about the same issue I resolved to find a solution,…

sneak:

Radiohead, All I Need — Live in the basement. This is one of a whole series of them playing songs from In Rainbows live, which are well worth the watch.

columbiasipa:

Rebuilding After Katrina: Creating an Environmentally Sustainable Port
Like much of the Gulf Coast, Gulfport, Mississippi and its state port (above) were devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But where there is destruction, there is also opportunity: this was the view of 12 students in SIPA’s MPA program in Environmental Science and Policy. Together, they worked to guide the Port of Gulfport in rebuilding using environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable methods.
The 2011 workshop team comprised Fariya Ali, Peachie Aquino, Jennifer Barbour, Preston Cox, Jin Jin Huang, Joseph Gosselar, Charis Lypiridis, Roberto Leal, Nathan Rudder, Clayton Winter, Anastasia Wright, Hilary Young, and faculty adviser Gail Suchman.
The workshop focused on minimizing the ecological footprint of a 10-mile road connecting the port to the rail and highway systems. The group’s recommendations touched on the fuel used by vehicles, vegetation buffer zones, and the role of the local community.
“I came away understanding what an important issue ports are from an environmental sustainability standpoint,” said Anastasia Wright (MPA ’11). “Even though 90 percent of global trade is conducted by sea, it is still a highly unregulated industry in terms of pollution.”
The students hope the port’s stakeholders will consider their guidelines, even those that are not economically or logistically feasible right now. They believe their recommendations give the Port of Gulfport the potential to be a sustainable Port of the Future.
“We hope the report will be used as an advocacy piece,” say team members Roberto Leal (MPA 11’) and Preston Cox (MPA ‘11). “These recommendations will not only help to construct a better port, but will also include the adjacent low-income Gulfport community in the redevelopment project.”
- Sara Ray

columbiasipa:

Rebuilding After Katrina: Creating an Environmentally Sustainable Port

Like much of the Gulf Coast, Gulfport, Mississippi and its state port (above) were devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But where there is destruction, there is also opportunity: this was the view of 12 students in SIPA’s MPA program in Environmental Science and Policy. Together, they worked to guide the Port of Gulfport in rebuilding using environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable methods.

The 2011 workshop team comprised Fariya Ali, Peachie Aquino, Jennifer Barbour, Preston Cox, Jin Jin Huang, Joseph Gosselar, Charis Lypiridis, Roberto Leal, Nathan Rudder, Clayton Winter, Anastasia Wright, Hilary Young, and faculty adviser Gail Suchman.

The workshop focused on minimizing the ecological footprint of a 10-mile road connecting the port to the rail and highway systems. The group’s recommendations touched on the fuel used by vehicles, vegetation buffer zones, and the role of the local community.

“I came away understanding what an important issue ports are from an environmental sustainability standpoint,” said Anastasia Wright (MPA ’11). “Even though 90 percent of global trade is conducted by sea, it is still a highly unregulated industry in terms of pollution.”

The students hope the port’s stakeholders will consider their guidelines, even those that are not economically or logistically feasible right now. They believe their recommendations give the Port of Gulfport the potential to be a sustainable Port of the Future.

“We hope the report will be used as an advocacy piece,” say team members Roberto Leal (MPA 11’) and Preston Cox (MPA ‘11). “These recommendations will not only help to construct a better port, but will also include the adjacent low-income Gulfport community in the redevelopment project.”

- Sara Ray

lindahenneberg:

A short disclaimer: This post is about my experiences as a woman and as a non-physicist while at CERN. I feel that these are two separate issues, but I am having difficulty addressing them separately, since my experiences as a woman are so closely related to my experiences as a non-physicist in…

Hello

5by5-status:

We’ll be using this site to provide status updates about the 5by5.tv website and related services.

The Last Word

theutopian:

Daniel BellDaniel Bell reflects on Friends, Foes, Influences, Ideologies, the State of the Novel, the State of the Union, and the Old Neighborhood.

By Roberto Foa and Thomas Meaney.

Read More

vimeobuzz:

“I’m a big fan of the video community Vimeo. It’s sort of the independent version of YouTube. They recently launched a video school that shows users how to shoot good video.


robertreich:

The very idea that Social Security might be on the chopping block in order to pay the ransom Republicans are demanding reveals both the cravenness of their demands and the callowness of the opposition to those demands.

In a former life I was a trustee of the Social Security trust fund. So let me…